Nursing Student Class Projects (Formerly MSN)

Date of Award

8-2019

Document Type

Project

Course Number

NURS 6810

Course Name

Advanced Pathophysiology for the Advanced Practice Nurse

Professor’s Name

John Chovan PhD DNP RN APRN-CNP APRN-CNS & Sue Butz DNP RN CCRN-K

Keywords

Pathology, osteoporosis, bone, disease, skeletal

Subject Categories

Medicine and Health Sciences | Nursing

Abstract

Out of all the potential disease that may impact bones, osteoporosis is the most common. Over time it compromises the strength and integrity of the bone. As the bone becomes more compromised fragility fractures will result. A significant portion of the growing elderly population will be impacted by the disease current research indicates this is a growing drain on healthcare resources with a significant impact on morbidity and mortality for those who suffer fractures related to compromised bone integrity from osteoporosis. The disease is a world wide problem that will affect all countries and populations. While medications exist to help manage the disease, the best method of management is through prevention. Once bone density is lost, it cannot be recovered. As the older population grows and the associated cost of osteoporosis increases, more research and information must be available relating to diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. Understanding the progressive pathology of the disease is essential for the advance practice provider (McCance & Huether, 2018).

Reference:

McCance, K. L., & Huether, S. E. (eds.). (2018). Pathophysiology: The Biologic Basis for Disease in Adults and Children (8th ed.). St. Louis, MO: Elsevier/Mosby.

Included in

Nursing Commons

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